Cleghorn Family Tree

Ingram ShrimptonAge: 65 years18121878

Name
Ingram Shrimpton
Given names
Ingram
Surname
Shrimpton
Birth 22 November 1812 23 37
Birth of a brotherGeorge Shrimpton
about 1817 (Age 4 years)

Christening of a brotherGeorge Shrimpton
2 February 1817 (Age 4 years)
Death of a sisterMary Shrimpton
1829 (Age 16 years)
Address: Turl Street, All Saints
Cause: Died giving birth to her 3rd child
Death of a paternal grandfatherThomas Shrimpton
about February 1830 (Age 17 years)
MarriageJane AcottView this family
18 February 1833 (Age 20 years)
Birth of a son
#1
John Ingram Shrimpton
about 1833 (Age 20 years)

Birth of a daughter
#2
Frances Jane ‘Fanny’ Shrimpton
about 1835 (Age 22 years)
Birth of a son
#3
Walter George Shrimpton
27 December 1837 (Age 25 years)

Birth of a son
#4
John George Shrimpton
3 February 1840 (Age 27 years)
Birth of a daughter
#5
Eliza Ann Shrimpton
1840 (Age 27 years)
Birth of a daughter
#6
Clara Elizabeth Shrimpton
about 1843 (Age 30 years)
Occupation
Printer
1851 (Age 38 years)

Note: The first issue of the Lyttelton Times appeared on January 11, 1851, some 26 days after the presses arrived on board the Charlotte Jane on December 16, 1850. The printing plant was set up in a shed on Section No. 2, Norwich Quay. The paper was financed chiefly by Ingram Shrimpton of Crown Yard Printing Office, Oxford, although he himself did not come to New Zealand until 1853. Shrimpton engaged a foreman, a compositor and persuaded his son and nephew to come out as cadets.
Emigration 10 July 1853 (Age 40 years)
Immigration 18 October 1853 (Age 40 years)
Note: onboard the ship, "John Taylor". His brother John was also on the ship and they were accompanied by their wives and families
Birth of a son
#7
Reginald Arthur Shrimpton
1854 (Age 41 years)

Death of a fatherJohn Shrimpton
20 January 1854 (Age 41 years)
Death of a sonJohn Ingram Shrimpton
20 December 1856 (Age 44 years)

Cause: Accidently shot and killed by his brother Walter
Birth of a daughter
#8
Amy Rebecca Mary Shrimpton
1857 (Age 44 years)

Marriage of a childWalter George ShrimptonSarah Anne KingView this family
5 February 1857 (Age 44 years)
Address: temporary church in the Lyttelton barracks
Membership
Member of Masonic Lodge
1857 (Age 44 years)
Note: Lodge of Unanimity, No 604, E C Lyttelton
Marriage of a childJames Alexander KingFrances Jane ‘Fanny’ ShrimptonView this family
12 October 1858 (Age 45 years)
Death of a motherRebecca Hicks
16 August 1860 (Age 47 years)
Marriage of a childHenry Bacon QuinnClara Elizabeth ShrimptonView this family
20 February 1862 (Age 49 years)
Death of a sonWalter George Shrimpton
5 August 1862 (Age 49 years)
Cause: Pneumonia
Marriage of a childJohn George ShrimptonSarah Ann VincentView this family
3 May 1865 (Age 52 years)
Death of a sisterMatilda Shrimpton
13 October 1873 (Age 60 years)
Address: 2a St Johns Road
Death 6 September 1878 (Age 65 years)
Cause of death: Brights Disease
Note: Funeral Notice:
Obituary
Obituary
9 September 1878 (3 days after death)
Note: It is with feelings of deep regret that we have to chronicle the death of Mr Ingram Shrimpton, which occurred at Timaru at eleven o'clock on Friday morning. Mr Shrimpton's connection with Canterbury dates from the year 1850, when the plant of the Lyttelton Times, which journal was projected by him, was sent out in charge of his son, Mr John Ingram Shrimpton, his nephew, Mr Geo. Taylor, and others. They arrived in Lyttelton on anniversary day, Dec. 16, 1850, and on the eleventh of tho following January the first number of this journal was published. The son and nephew continued to manage the paper until October, 1853, when Mr Shrimpton arrived in the John Taylor, and personally conducted the Lyttelton Times until the end of 1857. He then disposed of the concern to Messrs Crosbie Ward and C. C. Bowen. Prior to his colonial career, Mr Shrimpton was the proprietor of one of the largest and best conducted printing offices in the world. He was printer to fche Architectural and Archaeological Societies of England, and turned out some of the finest illustrated works ever produced in the old country. At the great Exhibition of 1851 the excellence of his productions gained for him honourable distinction. After his severance from this journal, Mr Shrimpton went to North Canterbury, and became a farmer. Then he sold out and went to Timaru, in or near which he has since resided, and up to within a few months of his decease - he owned a back-country station' near the Hunter's' Hill. Even when at Timaru he could not relinquish his older pursuits, and he founded tho first newspaper produced there— soon, however, disposing of it. He was remarkable for his social qualities; a 'man' of somewhat hasty temper; but nevertheless always remaining upon the best possible terms with all to whom he was known, and being regarded always as a desirable neighbour or acquaintance. In public matters he but seldom took any part. The cause of his death was disease of the kidneys, his illness being of some months duration., Had his life been, spared for another month, he would have attained his 66th year.
Biography 1966 (87 years after death)

Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
Marriage:
elder sister
3 years
elder sister
3 years
elder brother
4 years
elder brother
4 years
himself
5 years
younger brother
Family with Jane Acott - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: 18 February 1833Oxford, England
child
child
child
son
son
-6 years
son
3 years
daughter
3 years
son
3 years
daughter
4 years
daughter
12 years
son
4 years
daughter

Occupation

The first issue of the Lyttelton Times appeared on January 11, 1851, some 26 days after the presses arrived on board the Charlotte Jane on December 16, 1850. The printing plant was set up in a shed on Section No. 2, Norwich Quay. The paper was financed chiefly by Ingram Shrimpton of Crown Yard Printing Office, Oxford, although he himself did not come to New Zealand until 1853. Shrimpton engaged a foreman, a compositor and persuaded his son and nephew to come out as cadets.

Immigration

onboard the ship, "John Taylor". His brother John was also on the ship and they were accompanied by their wives and families

Membership

Lodge of Unanimity, No 604, E C Lyttelton

Death

Funeral Notice: Member of Rangiora Lodge, Thumbnail Bio. Ingram Shrimpton, formerly of Lodge of Unanimity, No 604, E C Lyttelton. He was the first proprietor of the Lyttelton Times and a distinguished Oxford, England Printer. He was persuaded to come out to NZ, by the Canterbury Ass. Five or Six years after its inception, he disposed of his paper and took up land.

Obituary

It is with feelings of deep regret that we have to chronicle the death of Mr Ingram Shrimpton, which occurred at Timaru at eleven o'clock on Friday morning. Mr Shrimpton's connection with Canterbury dates from the year 1850, when the plant of the Lyttelton Times, which journal was projected by him, was sent out in charge of his son, Mr John Ingram Shrimpton, his nephew, Mr Geo. Taylor, and others. They arrived in Lyttelton on anniversary day, Dec. 16, 1850, and on the eleventh of tho following January the first number of this journal was published. The son and nephew continued to manage the paper until October, 1853, when Mr Shrimpton arrived in the John Taylor, and personally conducted the Lyttelton Times until the end of 1857. He then disposed of the concern to Messrs Crosbie Ward and C. C. Bowen. Prior to his colonial career, Mr Shrimpton was the proprietor of one of the largest and best conducted printing offices in the world. He was printer to fche Architectural and Archaeological Societies of England, and turned out some of the finest illustrated works ever produced in the old country. At the great Exhibition of 1851 the excellence of his productions gained for him honourable distinction. After his severance from this journal, Mr Shrimpton went to North Canterbury, and became a farmer. Then he sold out and went to Timaru, in or near which he has since resided, and up to within a few months of his decease - he owned a back-country station' near the Hunter's' Hill. Even when at Timaru he could not relinquish his older pursuits, and he founded tho first newspaper produced there— soon, however, disposing of it. He was remarkable for his social qualities; a 'man' of somewhat hasty temper; but nevertheless always remaining upon the best possible terms with all to whom he was known, and being regarded always as a desirable neighbour or acquaintance. In public matters he but seldom took any part. The cause of his death was disease of the kidneys, his illness being of some months duration., Had his life been, spared for another month, he would have attained his 66th year.

DeathGrave of Ingram and Jane ShrimptonGrave of Ingram and Jane Shrimpton
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Type: Tombstone