Cleghorn Family Tree

Eliza Hannah KirbyAge: 71 years18261897

Name
Eliza Hannah Kirby
Given names
Eliza Hannah
Surname
Kirby
Married name
Eliza Hannah Davis
Birth 1826
MarriagePhilip DavisView this family
1848 (Age 22 years)
Note: He married Eliza in London. when he was just short of 21 and would have needed a parent's permission to do so. Perhaps his stepmother would not oblige, hence their marriage in London or equally the Shrimptons haled from London so perhaps hadrelatives there though the choice of London is odd.
Birth of a son
#1
Thomas John Davis
about 1849 (Age 23 years)
Birth of a son
#2
Henry Frederick Davis
March 9, 1850 (Age 24 years)
Emigration 1867 (Age 41 years)
Note: onboard 'Lancashire Witch' sailing from London
Marriage of a childThomas John DavisMary Ann EvansView this family
February 29, 1872 (Age 46 years)
Address: St Michaels Church
Marriage of a childHenry Frederick DavisJane Murray BurnetView this family
January 6, 1876 (Age 50 years)
Death March 3, 1897 (Age 71 years)
Address: 120 Armagh Street
Cause of death: bronchitis and heart failure
Burial March 6, 1897 (3 days after death)
Cemetery: Block 22 Plot 222, Linwood Cemetery
Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
herself
Family with Philip Davis - View this family
husband
herself
Marriage: 1848London, England
2 years
son
14 months
son

Marriage

He married Eliza in London. when he was just short of 21 and would have needed a parent's permission to do so. Perhaps his stepmother would not oblige, hence their marriage in London or equally the Shrimptons haled from London so perhaps hadrelatives there though the choice of London is odd.

Emigration

The "Lancashire Witch" She was built in Québec, in 1854, using oak and tamarack. She was a full rigged ship of 1574 tons, sheathed in felt and yellow metal in 1855, and was eleven years off the stocks when she commenced trading to New Zealand. In 1856 owned by D.Dunbar. Port of registry: London Port of survey: London. Latter owned by Firnie and Co. of Liverpool, and in 1863 was chartered by the Shaw, Savill Co.

The ship sailed from London 02 April 1867 - arrived Lyttelton 29 July 1867, with a full compliment of cabin passengers [31 saloon, 12 second] and about 110 in the steerage. Of the latter 85 were Government passengers, and amongst them 52 singlewomen, to whom free passages were given.

The ship, with Captain King in command, anchored in Lyttelton harbour about 8 am, having arrived off the Heads on Sunday evening. She left Gravesend early in the morning of April 2, and was taken in tow by the steam tug and towards eveninganchored off Ramsgate. She weighed anchor at 4 pm on the 3rd; landed the river pilot and took on board the sea pilot. During the next three days experienced very heavy gales, which continued till the 8th, and the ship was compelled to put back.On the 9th the ship got under weigh again, was clear of the Channel on the 18th, having had 16 days continuous bad weather. Experienced a strong gale on the 20th, carrying away fore staysail, smashing one of the boats and filling the secondcabin with water. On the 20th passed 60 miles east of the Island of Madeira. Having now got into some fine weather, the passengers commenced to enjoy themselves, and on the evening of May 1 a concert was held on the main dack. [sic] Crossed theequator on the morning of May 15. The 24th being the Queen's Birthday, was celebrated with all due honour, rockets being fired, and in the evening a concert was held. On June 1 there was a little wind in the morning, which towards eveningfreshened to a gale, carrying away the fore-topsail. From this date to June 5 she experienced very heavy weather. Was off the coast of Australia on July 13. On the morning of July 14 Peter JACKSON, the sail maker, was found dead in his bed;supposed to have died of consumption. On the 23rd in the morning a heavy thunderstorm came on, with very vivid lightning. The sea got up very high, striking the bulwarks of the ship and breaking them and nearly drowning the first and secondofficers. The Snares were sighted at 9 am on the 24th, making the passage 96 days from land to land. The Peninsula was sighted on the morning of the 27th, and the vessel arrived at her anchorage as above. Two births occurred on board. The saloonand other passengers express themselves as highly pleased with the conduct of the captain and his officers during the voyage, and presented Captain KING with a testimonial.

The Commissioners report that they found the Ship in average condition as regards cleanliness. The provisions were reported as satisfactory in quality and quantity with the exception of Flour the quality of which was bad. The distillingapparatus (Graveley's) had worked but indifferently requiring to be continually going during the 24 hours to give a diminished supply to the Immigrants. The Single Women were generally well conducted and appear a desirable class of immigrantsbut to this there is a marked exception in the Case of 4 Girls all supplied from one Agent in London whose name will be communicated to the Provincial Government with detached particulars. The Immigrants of the Ship were of a nature that theCommissioners consider particularly objectionable, besides the presence of Single Male saloon passengers frequently objected to by the Commissioners in reporting previous ships. In the Lancashire Witch they note the following:

In the Single Woman's Compartment 2 Assisted Immigrants for a payment were allowed an enclosed cabin thus establishing difference when all should be equal.

In the Compartment allotted to married immigrants was Second Cabin passengers, free steerage passengers. The female Hospital and dispensary and through it only was access to the Store Room.

In the Single Men's Compartment was the Male Hospital, the Single Immigrants, free passengers, Immigrants (as in the Single Women's Compartments) for extra payment in Enclosed Cabin and besides these a portion of the Crew.

The Surgeon Superintendent, matron and officers of the ship are recommended for full gratuities.

Memorandarum. The four girls referred to in Report were sent by an Agent in London named Dawson. One at least came on board suffering from Venereal complaint and all 4 are believed to be prostitutes.

Memorandarum. The four girls referred to in Report were sent by an Agent in London named Dawson. One at least came on board suffering from Venereal complaint and all 4 are believed to be prostitutes.

Emigration

onboard 'Lancashire Witch' sailing from London